Sticky
A guide to the copses, woods and forests of Britain by Gabriel Hemery

My next work of non-fiction is a guide to Britain’s forests, woods and copses.
I’m keen to hear from woodland owners who would like to register, while the public can also nominate a woodland they would like to see included.Continue Reading

The Great British Elm Search

Despite what many people believe, there remain hundreds of mature elm trees across Britain. If you find one and would like to report it to researchers and conservationists, or are looking to see some yourself, check out this great online resource about healthy elms.Continue Reading

Ash trees at dawn in Cumbria

As the spread of ash dieback across Britain becomes noticeable, there is a peak in interest about the consequences of ash dieback, with landowners and conservationists seeking good advice about what tree species is best to plant to help nature recover. Here’s a simply summary for landowners, based of peer-reviewed research.Continue Reading

Young birch tree in a treeshelter

There are 60 or more trees in Britain that are native, meaning tree species, subspecies or hybrids that have established themselves without the hand of man. Yet only 35 are widespread meaning that the palette is actually quite limited, particularly when the full range of benefits from woodlands are considered, together with threats from environmental change.Continue Reading

I recently wrote about a short film that I’d made on behalf of the Sylva Foundation for the Forgotten Forests project, run by Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh (RBGE). I have been asked whether I could provide the full transcript.  I am pleased to offer it below. Watch the film Britain’sContinue Reading

Black walnut in Oxford Botanic Garden

Britain has many wonderful collections of trees in arboreta, botanic gardens and country parks.  Many of these are some of the oldest collections in the world.  I’ve created an interactive Google map showing the finest collections of trees in Britain. Click on the map icons to read more about eachContinue Reading

Forest of Dean plantation

Planting more of the same ‘native woodlands’ that now litter the English countryside with little more ambition in their creation and management than a membership publicity drive or community engagement excercise, will be regretted long after the PR-masters behind them have past. In their own way, these are as regrettable as the dark satanic rows of conifers that were planted sixty years ago.
If we continue to plant green fuzz across our food-producing fields, with little concern either for the impending need to be more self-sufficient in food production, or for the need to reduce our enormous reliance on timber imports, Britain’s environmental credibility will be increasingly undermined.Continue Reading