Ash dieback is an environmental calamity that will cost Britain £15 billion

A research paper published today estimates that the cost of ash dieback in Britain will reach £15 billion. I was privileged to have supported lead author Louise Hill as an external supervisor, and to be a co-author of the paper. Read More

A trait-based approach for forest ecosystem management

One of my more recent co-authored research articles has been selected as ‘Editor’s Choice’ in The Applied Ecologist’s Blog . The paper, Maintaining ecosystem properties after loss of ash in Great Britain by Louise Hill et al, focusses on the importance of using plant functional traits to predict potential changes to an ecosystem, following the loss of a key species. Read More

Resilience requires Awareness and Courage

Over the last few months I’ve been working with colleagues from across the forestry sector on a major report presenting data from a survey about awareness, activities and aspirations to environmental change among woodland owners and managers, and forestry professionals. The report demonstrates that private forestry holds the balance of power in meeting the challenges of… Read More

Oak processionary moth (OPM) – a disaster already happening

Every now and then in life you gain sudden clarity of vision about an issue; perhaps triggered by listening to someone erudite, reading something written with super clarity, or seeing it with your own eyes.  In my case it is the latter and I’m worried – super worried in fact. I am not prone to… Read More