Ash trees at dawn in Cumbria

As the spread of ash dieback across Britain becomes noticeable, there is a peak in interest about the consequences of ash dieback, with landowners and conservationists seeking good advice about what tree species is best to plant to help nature recover. Here’s a simply summary for landowners, based of peer-reviewed research.Continue Reading

CurrentBiology_6May2019_GabrielHemery

Given the massive media interest in the paper I co-authored which published last week in Current Biology — 280 news channels, magazines, and newspapers, and counting— it was easy to overlook that the journal selected one of my tree photographs for the cover of the issue.Continue Reading

Ash trees at dawn in Cumbria

One of my more recent co-authored research articles has been selected as ‘Editor’s Choice’ in The Applied Ecologist’s Blog . The paper, Maintaining ecosystem properties after loss of ash in Great Britain by Louise Hill et al, focusses on the importance of using plant functional traits to predict potential changes to an ecosystem, following the loss of a key species.Continue Reading

Young birch tree in a treeshelter

There are 60 or more trees in Britain that are native, meaning tree species, subspecies or hybrids that have established themselves without the hand of man. Yet only 35 are widespread meaning that the palette is actually quite limited, particularly when the full range of benefits from woodlands are considered, together with threats from environmental change.Continue Reading