Fall in woodland

The colours and texture of Autumn are perfectly captured, with a hint of seasonal swirling winds. I love the idea of falling into the woodland; like disappearing down a silvan plug hole.Continue Reading

Barrow Wake panorama

Barrow Wake is a well-known viewpoint near the village of Birdlip in Gloucestershire, England. It has fine views from its seat on the Cotswolds, looking West over the Vale of Gloucester towards the distant Malvern Hills. The view was particularly fine earlier this week when I happened to be passingContinue Reading

The grey squirrel is perhaps one of the most commonly seen of British mammals being highly visible in parks, gardens and woodlands.  This, in combination with its large eyes and bushy tail, often make it an attractive and popular animal in the public eye. Grey squirrels are, however, a seriousContinue Reading

A briefing document has been published by the Our Forests ginger group, setting the record straight about ancient woodlands in England. During the public outcry over the Government’s declared proposals to dispose of the public woods and forests managed by the Forestry Commission in England, particular concerns were raised aboutContinue Reading

Chene d'Ecole, Belleme Forest

Translate to French Aujourd’hui, c’est la Fête Nationale en France: today is Bastille Day in France.  It seemed to be a perfect occasion to celebrate France and its wonderful trees and forests. Le peuple français et ses forêts The trees and forests of France are deeply engrained in the FrenchContinue Reading

Common spotted orchid

This weekend I revisited a woodland plantation that I’d planted 19 years ago.  I was delighted to discover a coterie of common spotted orchids (Dactylorhiza fuchsii).  The sweet chestnut trees that I’d planted had been coppiced, as originally planned, and were accompanied by ‘volunteer’ silver birch.  The light shading canopyContinue Reading

Forest of Dean plantation

Planting more of the same ‘native woodlands’ that now litter the English countryside with little more ambition in their creation and management than a membership publicity drive or community engagement excercise, will be regretted long after the PR-masters behind them have past. In their own way, these are as regrettable as the dark satanic rows of conifers that were planted sixty years ago.
If we continue to plant green fuzz across our food-producing fields, with little concern either for the impending need to be more self-sufficient in food production, or for the need to reduce our enormous reliance on timber imports, Britain’s environmental credibility will be increasingly undermined.Continue Reading